A Theology for the Church

The revised edition of A Theology for the Church retains its original structure, organized under these traditional theological categories: revelation, God, humanity, Christ, the Holy Spirit, salvation, the church, and last things. Each chapter within these sections contains answers to the following four questions: What does the Bible say? What has the church believed? How does it all fit together? How does this doctrine impact the church today? Contributions from leading Baptist thinkers R. Albert Mohler, Jr., Paige Patterson, and Mark Dever among others will also appeal to the broader evangelical community. Included in this revision are new chapters on theological method from a missional perspective (Bruce Ashford and Keith Whitfield) and theology of creation, providence, and Sabbath that engages current research in science and philosophy (Chad Owen Brand). Chapters on special revelation (David Dockery) and human nature (John Hammett) have also been updated.

Manual of Theology

John L. Dagg's guide to theology offers superb spiritual insight from the viewpoint of a senior preacher and theologian of the American Baptist movement. As Dagg's masterwork, the Manual of Theology is an honest and practical guide to the many aspects and qualities of Bible theology. Perhaps significantly, Dagg opens his great work with a chapter on inspiration - the fact that God inspired and communicated the Bible, and why all Christians should acknowledge this truth if they are to understand His guidance in their lives. Dagg also discusses the individual Christian life and soul. The penalty of losing one's soul, if indeed one sins to such an extent as to be distant from the Lord, is confirmed to be the worst any person may suffer. However, Dagg continues on a more hopeful note: one's soul can be redeemed and saved, although the numbers of souls to have gained such redemption is only small.

Manual of Theology

John L. Dagg's guide to theology offers superb spiritual insight from the viewpoint of a senior preacher and theologian of the American Baptist movement. As Dagg's masterwork, the Manual of Theology is an honest and practical guide to the many aspects and qualities of Bible theology. Perhaps significantly, Dagg opens his great work with a chapter on inspiration - the fact that God inspired and communicated the Bible, and why all Christians should acknowledge this truth if they are to understand His guidance in their lives. Dagg also discusses the individual Christian life and soul. The penalty of losing one's soul, if indeed one sins to such an extent as to be distant from the Lord, is confirmed to be the worst any person may suffer. However, Dagg continues on a more hopeful note: one's soul can be redeemed and saved, although the numbers of souls to have gained such redemption is only small. The avoidance and repentance of sin is a further topic which occupies much of Dagg's reflection. What sin is, and how we must escape its clutches to lead a virtuous existence, is discussed. Dagg explains various attributes of forgiveness from God; why it is required and why we should strive for it should we ever stray from the path of good and righteous deeds. Following on from this, Dagg explains how the Christian's mission in life is justified by his desire for peace, joy and harmony for himself and others. Several chapters of this book are devoted to Jesus Christ, and the significance of His actions in life and the symbols which are associated with His being. The cross is explored in depth as a deeply significant object of sacrifice for one's faith, whilst Christ's ability to save mortals who have been condemned for their sins is detailed. In all, John L. Dagg's Manual of Theology offers a thorough and excellent guide to the major traits and doctrines of the Christian faith, that believers may aspire to greater harmony with themselves and God. Dagg's language is plain and forthright, and his capacity for explanation so significant that to name this work a classic of Christianity is no exaggeration. This edition of the Manual of Theology includes all of the original notes, which are appended after the paragraphs which they occur. This allows readers to contemplate both the learned sentiments of the work, and associated thoughts and sources which Dagg draws on in order to bless us with his insight and knowledge.

The Ethics of Aquinas

In this comprehensive anthology, twenty-seven outstanding scholars from North America and Europe address every major aspect of Thomas Aquinas's understanding of morality and comment on his remarkable legacy. The opening chapters of The Ethics of Aquinas introduce readers to the sources, methods, and major themes of Aquinas's ethics. Part II of the book provides an extended discussion of ideas in the Second Part of the Summa Theologiae, in which contributors present cogent interpretations of the structure, major arguments, and themes of each of the treatises. The third and final part examines the legacy of Thomistic ethics for the twentieth century and today. These essays reflect a diverse group of scholars representing a variety of intellectual perspectives. Contributors span numerous fields of study, including intellectual history, medieval studies, moral philosophy, religious ethics, and moral theology. This remarkable variety underscores how interpretations of Thomas's ethics continue to develop and evolve -- and stimulate fervent discussion within the academy and the church. Book jacket.

Manual of Theology (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Manual of Theology Theology is the science which deals with the Being and Nature of God. Christian Theology is the expression and analysis of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. All speculation into the First Cause of the world, the ground of moral obligation, even the immortality of the human soul, is or may be theological; that is, any one of these questions may be so discussed as to bring before us the notion of a Supreme Being, who made the world, whose nature is the source of the distinction of right and wrong, who brought man's soul into being, and preserves it continuously from dissolution. On the other hand, all such questions fail to be theological just in proportion as the idea of the Supreme Being is dropped out of sight. They must then be treated as subor dinate sections of physics, or of psychology, or of metaphysics. They take their theological colour from their contact with the idea of a Supreme Being, and no treatment of them apart from this idea is, in the strict sense, theological at all. As for the Being and Nature of God, apart from the Christian revelation of Him, we must derive our knowledge of it from the theological treatment of the questions mentioned above. By reflection upon the order of nature, of a certain kind, we reach the notion of a Creator. By reflection of a certain kind upon the moral law we reach the notion of a Personal Ruler of mankind, who rewards and punishes; and this result leads on to the discussion of the Immorality of Man. These are the contents of Natural Theology, as it is called; and they represent more or less completely the area over which man can move in the way of independent Speculation. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Manual of Theology

Excerpt from Manual of Theology: A Treatise on Christian Doctrine Introduction. Duty of Believing in Jesus Christ chapter I. Person of Christ. Sec. 1. Humanity 2. Ooooooooooooooo ooooooooooooo o. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.